Have Fun with Your Hair This Spring

Fishtail Braid Photo by Elaine Whitney at Flickr Creative Commons.Spring is a great time to experiment with new hairstyles and start getting ready for summer. This doesn’t have to mean changing your hair color or cutting your hair. You can do so much with fun braids and more!

A great site that I like to get e-mail tips from is Daily Makeover. Recently, Daily Makeover had some videos on “5 Easy Spring Hairstyle Tutorials.” I wanted to share them with you, as they are very straightforward but can freshen up your look!

My favorite is the fishtail braid, and Lauren Conrad shows an easy way to do it yourself. A hairstyle like the fishtail braid is great for skating practice. Fancier hairstyles are typically better for competition, but it depends on your program. Check with your coach about your competition hairstyle.

Read the entire article.

March 23, 2012

Competition Makeup Tips

Competition Makeup at the 2010 World Figure Skating Championships - Mark Hanretty and Christina Chitwood (AP Photo Antonio Calanni)

Competition Makeup at the 2010 World Figure Skating Championships - Mark Hanretty and Christina Chitwood (AP Photo Antonio Calanni)

When you compete in an event that is judged, appearance is typically taken into consideration. Even if there isn’t a mark for appearance, your appearance in how you present yourself can affect how the judges perceive your ability.

As much as it would be nice to believe that only ability is judged, the human eye tends to be drawn toward those who are well presented. If you’re in a sport such as figure skating and you’re female, makeup should be an important part of your competition regimen.

Here are competition makeup tips for figure skaters or anyone in a similar sport or art.

Read the entire article.

February 10, 2012

Recovering from Mistakes in Competition

This week I want to talk about competition mistakes because eventually every skater ends up falling or tripping in a competition program. The best skaters will recover immediately, and they’ll usually forget about the mistake quickly.

I’ve found the best way to forget about the mistake is by transferring your focus to the next element in the program. If you dwell on the mistake, that is when you tend to lose focus and possibly make many more mistakes.

You can develop mistake recovery by practicing like a competition. When you make a mistake in practice, you should resume your program with the same expression and energy as before the fall.

Here’s an example of 2010 Olympic silver medalists and 2011 World champions Charlie White and Meryl Davis at a recent ISU Grand Prix competition in Russia. You see Charlie take a significant stumble early in the program, but he quickly resumes composure, getting right back in sync with Meryl. This causes the audience to forget about the mistake and keeps any negative marks by the judges minimal.

 

YouTube Preview Image

 

December 5, 2011

Top 5 Performance Reminders for Skating Competitions

Christina Chitwood and Mark Hanretty performing the Finnstep at the 2009 European Championships (Photo by Liz Chastney)

Christina Chitwood and Mark Hanretty performing the Finnstep at the 2009 European Championships (Photo by Liz Chastney)

With regionals having recently ended, competitions for our students coming up the next two weekends, sectionals and nationals coming up, and the international competition season continuing, I want to provide some tips for any competitor, any level. Some of these may seem basic, but even the top competitors in the world sometimes forget to do them.

1. SMILE! :) Unless your coach has asked you to use a different expression to portray your program, you should be smiling!

Read the entire article

October 21, 2011

Halloween and Skating Costumes

With Halloween coming up, everyone is thinking about costumes. In figure skating, costumes are important throughout the year. For technical events in skating, I feel that while a good costume can help the judges remember the skater, strong skating is much more important than just having an elaborate dress.

However, for events such as artistic and spotlight where the focus is on originality and music interpretation, costumes are much more important to the overall performance quality. As a rule of thumb, it’s useful for the judges to be able to tell what type of music the skater will be performing to by looking at their costume before the music starts. It’s also nice for spotlight events to have a surprise layer of costume underneath the first layer or some other unique twist to the costume.

Here’s a Halloween show video with some good tricks in it. If you’re looking for Halloween costume ideas for skating, there are some interesting ones in the video!

YouTube Preview Image
October 9, 2011